Alex Whalen

Policy Analyst

Alex Whalen is a Policy Analyst with the Fraser Institute and coordinator for many of the activities for the recently launched Atlantic Canada division. Prior to joining the Institute, Alex was the Vice-President of the Atlantic Institute for Market Studies (AIMS), which merged with the Fraser Institute in November 2019. He is a graduate of the Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University, where he focused on business and tax law, and of the UPEI Business School, where he focused on economics and entrepreneurship. He brings prior experience as an entrepreneur, business manager, and freelance writer to his work at the Institute. His writing has appeared in the National Post, Chronicle-Herald, Telegraph-Journal, Prince Arthur Herald, Charlottetown Guardian, Journal Pioneer, and UPEI School of Business Magazine. A native of Summerside, PEI, he writes regularly on public finance, taxation, municipal affairs, and economics.

Recent Research by Alex Whalen

— Jan 30, 2020
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Atlantic Canada

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Atlantic Canada finds that public-sector employees in the four Atlantic provinces—including municipal, provincial and federal government workers—received 11.9 per cent higher wages on average than comparable workers in the private sector in 2018, and also enjoyed more generous pensions, earlier retirement, more time off for personal leave and greater job security.

— Nov 20, 2019
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Catching Up with Canada: A Prosperity Agenda for Atlantic Canada

Catching Up with Canada: A Prosperity Agenda for Atlantic Canada is the first study from the Institute’s new Atlantic Canada Initiative. It finds that even though Atlantic Canada currently lags the rest of the country in several key economic indicators—including household incomes, GDP per capita and the employment rate, among others—the region could close the gap by pursuing pro-growth policy reforms similar to those enacted recently in Michigan and Ireland. In fact, if Atlantic Canada could achieve an inflation-adjusted economic growth rate of 1.6 per cent—0.9 percentage points above forecasted growth for the rest of Canada—the region would catch up with the rest of Canada within 20 years.