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Elmira Aliakbari

Associate Director, Natural Resource Studies, Fraser Institute

Elmira Aliakbari is Associate Director of Natural Resource Studies at the Fraser Institute. She received a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Guelph, and M.A. and B.S. degrees in Economics, both from the University of Tehran in Iran. She has studied public policy involving energy and the environment for nearly eight years. Prior to joining the Fraser Institute, Ms. Aliakbari was Director of Research, Energy, Ecology and Prosperity with the Frontier Center for Public Policy. She has presented her work at many academic conferences and has been published in the prestigious academic journal Energy Economics. Ms. Aliakbari’s research has been discussed in prominent media outlets including the Wall Street Journal, and her commentaries have appeared in major Canadian and American newspapers such as the Globe and Mail, Washington Times, National Post, and Financial Post.

Recent Research by Elmira Aliakbari

— Feb 25, 2020
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Annual Survey of Mining Companies, 2019

This year’s Annual Survey of Mining Companies finds that, for the first time in 10 years, no Canadian jurisdiction ranks in the top 10 for “investment attractiveness” according to mining executives and investors.

— Nov 14, 2019
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Canada-US Energy Sector Competitiveness Survey 2019

The Canada-US Energy Sector Competitiveness Survey finds that Texas is more than twice as attractive for oil and gas investment than Alberta. Specifically, uncertain environmental regulations, regulatory inconsistencies and pipeline constraints are major deterrents to greater energy investment in Alberta and across Canada. In fact, the study also ranks 20 North American jurisdictions based on policies affecting oil and gas investment, and Saskatchewan was Canada’s highest-ranked province at 13th out of 20. Alberta ranked 16th, and Texas ranked 1st overall.

— Nov 5, 2019
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The Ontario Government’s Electricity Policies 2018–2019

The Ontario Government’s Electricity Policies 2018-2019: How They Are Failing and How to Fix Them finds that electricity prices in Ontario have continued to rise over the past year, despite the Ontario government’s attempts to lower them. In fact, even with a new debt-funded government subsidy, residential electricity prices in Toronto rose by five per cent from April 2018 to April 2019 and residents across Ontario are paying 22 per cent more (on average) for electricity than the rest of Canada.