Tegan Hill

Economist

Tegan Hill is an Economist at the Fraser Institute. She holds a Bachelor of Economics and a Master’s Degree in Public Policy from the University of Calgary. Ms. Hill’s articles have appeared in major Canadian newspapers including the Globe and Mail, National Post, and Ottawa Citizen. She specializes in government spending, taxation, and debt.

Recent Research by Tegan Hill

— Feb 20, 2020
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Alberta’s Lost Advantage on Personal Income Tax Rates

Alberta’s Lost Advantage on Personal Income Tax Rates finds that the province’s top combined personal income tax rate is now more than 10 percentage points higher than the top rate in several other energy-producing jurisdictions. Whereas in 2014, Alberta’s top PIT rate was the lowest in North America, now it is the 10th highest following tax increases by the provincial and federal governments, and a reduction of the federal top rate in the U.S.

— Feb 4, 2020
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Examining Federal Debt in Canada by Prime Ministers Since Confederation, 2020

Examining Federal Debt in Canada by Prime Ministers Since Confederation, 2020 finds that Justin Trudeau is the only prime minister since 1900—and only one of three prime ministers since Confederation—whose government increased Canada’s per-person debt without facing a world war or recession. Compare that to other recent governments led by Jean Chrétien, Paul Martin and Lester B. Pearson whose tenures were also without a world war or recession. The Chrétien government cut per-person federal government debt by 13.3 per cent followed by Martin’s (7.6 per cent) and Pearson’s (6.7 per cent).

— Jan 7, 2020
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Prime Ministers and Government Spending: 2020 Edition

Prime Ministers and Government Spending, 2020 finds that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has now recorded the highest ever per-person spending level of any federal government, including those that fought wars or faced recessions. Adjusting for inflation, the study finds that spending in 2019 ($9,066 per Canadian) tops the previous all-time record of $8,811 (in 2019 dollars) set by Prime Minister Stephen Harper in 2009 during the global recession.