Alberta Prosperity

— Feb 20, 2020
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Alberta’s Lost Advantage on Personal Income Tax Rates

Alberta’s Lost Advantage on Personal Income Tax Rates finds that the province’s top combined personal income tax rate is now more than 10 percentage points higher than the top rate in several other energy-producing jurisdictions. Whereas in 2014, Alberta’s top PIT rate was the lowest in North America, now it is the 10th highest following tax increases by the provincial and federal governments, and a reduction of the federal top rate in the U.S.

— Feb 19, 2020
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Interest Costs and their Growing Burden on Canadians

Interest Costs and their Growing Burden on Canadians finds that in fiscal year 2019-20, Ottawa will spend more than $24 billion on federal debt interest payments, as the federal debt has increased by more than $260 billion since the 2008-09 recession. The study also compares government debt interest costs among provinces.

— Jan 28, 2020
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Refining Alberta’s Equalization Gambit

Refining Alberta’s Equalization Gambit argues that, despite popular misconceptions (particularly in Central Canada), Alberta can compel other provinces and the federal government to negotiate aspects of the Constitution including equalization. The essay cites past Supreme Court judgments and germane sections of the Constitution Act, 1982.

— Jan 16, 2020
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The Growing Debt Burden for Canadians

The Growing Debt Burden for Canadians finds that, since 2007/08, the year before the last recession, combined federal and provincial debt has grown from $837.0 billion to a projected $1.5 trillion in 2019/20. The study also breakdowns provincial debt burdens based on several different measures.

— Dec 12, 2019
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Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada: 2020 Edition

Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada, 2020 Edition finds that nominal spending on public schools across Canada has increased in every province in recent years. After adjusting for inflation and enrolment changes, per-student spending still increased in seven out of 10 provinces from 2012/13 to 2016/17, the most recent year of available Statistics Canada data.

— Dec 5, 2019
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What’s Changed, By How Much, and What Remains to be Done: An Analysis of Alberta’s Budget

What’s Changed, By How Much, and What Remains to be Done: An Analysis of Alberta’s Budget finds that the Alberta government’s plan to eliminate the provincial deficit by reducing program spending by 1.6 per cent over the next four years is less aggressive—both by timeline and by the amount of spending reductions—than previous successful deficit-reduction plans by other governments across Canada, including in Alberta, Saskatchewan and at the federal level.

Alberta Prosperity Research Experts