Ontario Prosperity

— Feb 19, 2020
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Interest Costs and their Growing Burden on Canadians

Interest Costs and their Growing Burden on Canadians finds that in fiscal year 2019-20, Ottawa will spend more than $24 billion on federal debt interest payments, as the federal debt has increased by more than $260 billion since the 2008-09 recession. The study also compares government debt interest costs among provinces.

— Feb 6, 2020
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Uneven Recovery: Job Creation in Ontario’s Urban Centres between 2008 and 2018

Uneven Recovery: Job Creation in Ontario’s Urban Centres between 2008 and 2018, which compares the job-creation numbers of various regions across Ontario, finds that 90.8 per cent of all net job-creation in the province since the 2008/09 recession occurred in the GTA and Ottawa.

— Jan 16, 2020
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The Growing Debt Burden for Canadians

The Growing Debt Burden for Canadians finds that, since 2007/08, the year before the last recession, combined federal and provincial debt has grown from $837.0 billion to a projected $1.5 trillion in 2019/20. The study also breakdowns provincial debt burdens based on several different measures.

— Dec 12, 2019
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Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada: 2020 Edition

Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada, 2020 Edition finds that nominal spending on public schools across Canada has increased in every province in recent years. After adjusting for inflation and enrolment changes, per-student spending still increased in seven out of 10 provinces from 2012/13 to 2016/17, the most recent year of available Statistics Canada data.

— Nov 28, 2019
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Ontario, 2019

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Ontario finds that public-sector employees in Ontario—including municipal, provincial and federal government workers—received 10.3 per cent higher wages on average than comparable workers in the private sector last year, and also enjoyed more generous pensions, earlier retirement, more personal leave and greater job security.

— Nov 5, 2019
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The Ontario Government’s Electricity Policies 2018–2019

The Ontario Government’s Electricity Policies 2018-2019: How They Are Failing and How to Fix Them finds that electricity prices in Ontario have continued to rise over the past year, despite the Ontario government’s attempts to lower them. In fact, even with a new debt-funded government subsidy, residential electricity prices in Toronto rose by five per cent from April 2018 to April 2019 and residents across Ontario are paying 22 per cent more (on average) for electricity than the rest of Canada.

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