Taxes

— Feb 27, 2020
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The Budget That Changed Canada: Essays on the 25th Anniversary of the 1995 Budget is a new book of collected essays celebrating Jean Chrétien and Paul Martin’s historic federal budget that tackled head-on the pressing fiscal challenges facing the nation following nearly 30 years of deficits and mounting debt. The 1995 budget, which reduced program spending and led to balanced budgets, shrinking debt and eventually broad-based tax relief, laid the foundation for more than a decade of economic prosperity and is one of the main reasons Canada weathered the 2009 global recession better than most other industrialized countries.

— Feb 20, 2020
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Alberta’s Lost Advantage on Personal Income Tax Rates

Alberta’s Lost Advantage on Personal Income Tax Rates finds that the province’s top combined personal income tax rate is now more than 10 percentage points higher than the top rate in several other energy-producing jurisdictions. Whereas in 2014, Alberta’s top PIT rate was the lowest in North America, now it is the 10th highest following tax increases by the provincial and federal governments, and a reduction of the federal top rate in the U.S.

— Jan 23, 2020
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Should Upper-Income Canadians Pay More Income Tax?

Should Upper-Income Canadians Pay More Income Tax? finds that in 2017, the latest year of comparable data, the top 10 per cent of income-earners earned 34.2 per cent of Canada’s total income—yet paid 54.6 per cent of the country’s total income taxes.

— Oct 17, 2019
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Who Bears the Burden of Property Taxes in Canada’s Largest Metropolitan Areas?

Who Bears the Burden of Property Taxes in Canada’s Largest Metropolitan Areas? analyzes the ratio of municipal and provincial property tax rates (including education) paid by residents, businesses and industries in Canada’s major urban areas. It finds that across the country, but particularly in the cities of Toronto, Montreal, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver, businesses pay much higher property tax rates than residents, which can erode competitiveness and lead to business migration, reduced hiring and investment, and even business closures.

— Aug 27, 2019
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Marginal Effective Tax Rates Across Provinces: High Rates on Low Income

Marginal Effective Tax Rates Across Provinces: High Rates on Low Income finds that Canadian families and individuals with annual incomes between $30,000 and $60,000 face marginal effective tax rates near or above 50 per cent, a higher percentage than what Canadians in some top income tax brackets face.

— Aug 22, 2019
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The Impact of the Federal Carbon Tax on the Competitiveness of Canadian Industries finds that the federal carbon tax will increase production costs in key sectors and could trigger a phenomenon known as “carbon leakage”—where firms relocate industrial activity (including petroleum and coal-product manufacturing) to countries with less-stringent climate policies.

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